craigdurling.com

Some random thoughts…

Happy Thanksgiving and a Great Video Hosting Site

Happy Thanksgiving all!

With events like those in Mumbai occurring all too frequently, I am constantly reminded of how lucky I am to be blessed with the friends and family that I have. This includes all of you!

One more thing: While following such photographers as Chase Jarvis and others, I recently discovered a fantastic site to host videos such as the ones I shot during the recent Triangle Complex wildfires. Free to join and FREE video storage! You can also embed your videos directly onto your website. Check it out. I’ve posted the videos from the fires on my Viddler.com page: http://www.viddler.com/explore/cdurling/videos/

Eat well, celebrate what you have and be safe out there!

Craig

 

 

November 27, 2008 Posted by | Photography, Podcasting, visual arts | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dispelling Some Copyright Myths & My Thoughts

Here’s a link to a great article by Scott Bourne of Twipphoto.com on dispelling some copyright myths: http://twipphoto.com/archives/1554

Reading Scott’s article got me thinking. In addition to the informative comments by Scott, keep in mind that the issue of copyright can be a very complex one. Do keep in mind though, that even though your photos enjoy the protection of copyright once you make them, you’ll need to REGISTER them with the US Copyright office in order to be fully protected (legally) in the event your image(s) is(are) used without your permission.

I’ve heard from many a reputable source that if you do not REGISTER your images and they are used without your permission, you’re basically only entitled to the going rate in return from the user. In other words, what they would have paid you to use it anyway, and maybe a little more for punitive damages. If the image was REGISTERED, however, the penalty starts in the tens of thousands of dollars. Since most large marketing and advertising agencies are aware of this, they are usually more than happy to offer you fair market value for the use of the image. Once you’ve discovered that they’ve used your image, of course.  I, personally, would never settle for the “minimum”.  I’ll try my best to get them to pay for not only the use of the images, but for they lesson they need to learn as well.  And that’s usually considerably more than the licensing of the image itself.  Remember, if the image they used was REGISTERED, the law is on my side, not theirs.

I’ve registered my images with the US Copyright Office in the past, the process is very simple. Download the form, burn all the images you want to register onto a disc, however many that may be, send it in with a check and you’re done. In a couple of months you’ll receive a time/date stamped copy of your form back. You’re submission was registered as soon it was stamped as received. Done.

Do this on a regular basis – annually, monthly, whatever. Just DO IT! I do it annually (for the most part). I tend to submit any images I’ve sold, published and posted on the internet in that year. Basically, any images that have left my computer/office. I’ll burn a DVD entitled “Craig Durling Images 2008” (or whatever) and send it in with the form and check (about $35 as I recall). As long as you submit it using a searchable media, they’ll accept it.  This allows the US Copyright Office to search your images in the event that you need to prove that you’ve registered them.  Check their website for more info on how to do this.

You might think of it this way, which is what I’ve been told by some photogs and attorneys: “If it’s REGISTERED, any copyright attorney will be glad to help.  If it’s only COPYRIGHTED they’re likely to tell you (politely) to pound sand.”  

That reminds me, I have to put together my submission for 2008, and SO DO YOU!

November 21, 2008 Posted by | Photography, visual arts | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

So Cal Wildfires

Hey folks,
 
Spent all day/night yesterday at the Sayre and Corona wildfires (Corona has since been renamed as part of the “Triangle Complex Fire”.  Some incredible images and incredible firestorm conditions.  Block after block of SFD’s fully involved in fire with minimal suppression resources available.  I’ll be editing some of the images later today and will get them up on my site shortly.  For now, I’ve put Episode 15 of the Fireground Action Photography podcast up on the site at http://www.firegroundaction.com/Media.html and on iTunes.  This is a special episode because I carried a handheld MP3 recorder to the front lines with me to share the experience and the sounds of the fire.  Thanks to Ed Sherman, Keith Cullom, Glenn Zachman and Doug Pearson for their contributions to the show.  
 
The fires are still burning but please take some time out to download and listen to the podcast.  Images will follow, and if time permits, I will compile an enhanced version of the podcast complete with images.  Recording the action on the front lines was a unique experience.  I shot stills, video and audio.  Added to the normal chaos of a wildfire, I truly tested myself and I must say, I’m pleased with the results.  For example, while watching a Cathedral City engine company being overrun by flames, I was shooting stills with one hand, and recording video and audio with the other.  I’ll post everything as the week progresses and time permits.
 
Best wishes to not only the victims of these fires, but the public safety personnel and fellow fire photographers still out there.  
  
I’ll share one more thought.  I will never forget the pride I felt in one neighborhood in Yorba Linda when I was photographing a fully involved SFD with only two handlines in operation to extinguish it.  The amazing and unforgettable part for me was the image of a firefighter on the nozzle and three police officers backing him up on the line.  Next to that was another police officer putting out spot fires with a garden hose.  Absolutely amazing.  I’m getting emotional just remembering the moment.  Never before have I been so proud of my brothers in blue.  Although I didn’t jump on the line with them, I felt that documenting their efforts for history was why I was put in that neighborhood at that moment in time.  Otherwise, the public may never have known of the heroic efforts of these firefighters and police officers.  With a heartfelt thank you, job well done to all… 

November 16, 2008 Posted by | Photography, Podcasting, visual arts | , , , , , | Leave a comment